Four remarkably restored historic buildings have been honored with Preservation Awards from Hudson Heritage Association.

The awards, created by HHA in 2017, recognize, honor and celebrate historic Hudson properties, buildings and landscapes that have been preserved or restored within the last five years. The 2019 Preservation Awards were announced and presented at HHA’s annual members-only celebration on May 9 inside Hudson’s Town Hall.

The award recipients included:

Western Reserve Academy’s Seymour Hall. Built in 1913, the school’s main classroom building underwent an ambitious $14 million restoration in 2017-18. The judges raved about the project’s use of original elements and materials. “An excellent example of large-scale historic preservation,” the judges said.

 

Hudson’s Town Hall. Built in 1879, one of Hudson’s most important buildings underwent a careful first-floor renovation that was completed in 2016. The public now enjoys an enhanced public lobby, new restrooms, the Destination Hudson Visitor Center and the Hudson Fire Museum. “Original architectural components have been preserved and alterations were executed to reflect an earlier use of the building as Hudson first fire house,” the judges remarked.

 

 

 

37 Baldwin Street. Built in 1853, this Gothic Revival home, which is owned by Western Reserve Academy, underwent an extensive renovation in 2017-18. “Great care was taken to follow the U.S. Department of Interior Historic Preservation Standards,” the judges said. “A great example of a successful historic renovation.”

121 Elm Street. This cross-gabled home, built in 1889, was carefully repaired and restored (siding, window sashes, architectural details, paint) in 2018. “This large undertaking was painstakingly performed by both the homeowner and historic contractor,” the judge remarked.

 

 

In addition to awards for the four structures, Hudson Heritage Association presented an honorable mention award to Hudson’s recently renovated World War I Memorial.

Properties nominated for Preservation Awards are reviewed by independent judges who tour the site and review documentation to ensure the integrity and historical accuracy of the restoration/preservation and that the project followed the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Standards for Historic Preservation. Recipients of the award receive special markers that commemorate the projects.

“For generations, historic buildings in Hudson have been carefully and lovingly restored to their original beauty and character,” said Inga Walker, HHA co-president. “The Preservation Awards allow Hudson Heritage Association to recognize these important projects and the people behind them.

“The 2019 recipients show that award-worthy projects can range from million-dollar renovations to smaller projects that preserve our town’s history and character.”

Nominations for the 2020 Hudson Heritage Association Preservation Awards will open later this year.