To call it a rare opportunity would be an understatement.

One historic farmhouse, gently used, packed with charm and history, in pristine condition – free to a good owner.

Yes, free!

The historic Hudson farmhouse at 1415 Middleton Road is free to a good owner willing to have it moved to a new location.

The new owners of the 1846 Oviatt-Curtiss homestead at 1415 Middleton Road in Hudson are planning to build two new homes on the property and are offering the historic 1846 farmhouse to an owner willing to preserve the structure by moving it to another location. The property’s terra cotta silo and other outbuildings are also available for free.

If a new owner and location cannot be found, the 174-year-old home and outbuildings will be demolished.

Hudson Heritage Association has offered to help find a new owner for the historic house. Whoever agrees to take the home will be responsible for the costs of moving it – either in one piece or dismantled – to a new location. HHA is working with a house-moving company to define the cost.

The historic farmhouse was built in 1846, and has been owned by only three families. An addition was built in 1883. The home offers beautiful wood floors, a stunning walnut-wood staircase and its original windows. The house has four bedrooms, one bathroom and covers roughly 2,000 square feet.

The historic Hudson farmhouse at 1415 Middleton Road is in excellent condition and offers beautiful wood floors, a stunning walnut-wood staircase and its original windows.

The farmhouse, located near the intersections of Middleton and Valley View roads, sits on a unique property with a rich history. In 1801, John Oviatt, one of Hudson’s original settlers, purchased the then-190-acre lot in the presence of David Hudson. Around 1818, Oviatt acquired an adjoining lot to the east, producing a sizeable full working farm of 320 acres.
“This house is in excellent condition and is ready for a glorious renovation in a new location,” said Hudson Heritage Association President Chris Bach. “There is a centuries-old tradition in Hudson of moving homes to new locations. It would be wonderful if an owner stepped forward to save this remarkable, historic structure and give it renewed life in a new location. Demolishing this house would be a tragedy.”

The property’s outbuildings, which include a historic terra cotta silo, are also available.

While a location in Hudson would be the preferred destination for the historic farmhouse, it’s not required, Bach added. “What’s most important,” he said, “is that we save this structure and its history.”

Anyone interested in making the 1846 Oviatt-Curtiss home their own, with or without its outbuildings, should email Hudson Heritage Association at info@hudsonheritage.org.